July got off to a promising start with a prolonged heatwave and our national team making it to the semi-finals of the World Cup for the first time since 1990. Unfortunately, our good luck ran out when England was knocked out by Croatia in the semi-finals and a thunderstorm dampened the heatwave across the country. Despite the highs and lows, here are four campaigns that we think rose to the top in July.

 This is not just any waistcoat, it's an M&S waistcoat.

This is not just any waistcoat, it's an M&S waistcoat.

England manager Gareth Southgate became a World Cup style icon thanks to his dashing Marks and Spencer waistcoat. In fact, the garment took on a life of its own as the excitement mounted for England’s players and #waistcoatwednesday trended on the day of the England Vs Croatia match. The campaign (raising money for charity Bloodwise) encouraged hundreds of people to get involved by wearing a waistcoat and sharing their photos. It inspired dozens of images including celebrity wearers Roman Kemp, Piers Morgan and Susanna Reid.

Marks and Spencer revealed that sales of the signature clothing item doubled since the start of the World Cup and searches for waistcoats on the company site had increased by over 100%. 

 Activists make a bold statement with hidden rainbow flag in Russia.

Activists make a bold statement with hidden rainbow flag in Russia.

Six activists for LGBTQ made a bold statement in Russia during the World Cup games. In Russia, it is illegal to display the LGBTQ rainbow flag, sparking a creative idea. Each activist wore a football shirt of one of the colours of the rainbow. The group visit different sites in their colour order, forming a hidden rainbow flag, showing their pride and unity whilst making a stand against Russia’s laws. Images of the group were shared around Twitter with the hashtag #hiddenflag and the brave statement was received very positively by people everywhere. 
 

 Controversy! William Hill buys #itscominghome during the World Cup.

Controversy! William Hill buys #itscominghome during the World Cup.

William Hill were accused of “hijacking” the England fans’ celebrations as they sponsored the popular hashtag, #itscominghome. From the 1996 song, “Three Lions” the popular line was used widely by fans as the English national team got closer to the finals. Fans took to twitter to vent their anger because the betting company had a William Hill football shirt icon next to the sponsored hashtag.  People also complained about the gambling ads on their Twitter feeds – a topic that can be seen as quite inappropriate to promote on a large scale. Never ones to be defeated, England fans cleverly changed the hashtag to the misspelt, #itscominhome.

 Wateraid's four-minute shower tunes for conserving water.

Wateraid's four-minute shower tunes for conserving water.

Brits are living the life, after weeks of hot weather has given us the summer we’ve all been waiting years for – but what does this mean for our water supply? With many parts of the country seeing minimal rain over the past few months, charity WaterAid thought of a creative and fun campaign to help spread the message of saving water during the sweltering hot month. Loaded up to Spotify? WaterAid’s “4-minute shower hits” playlist features 40 four minute long songs, including the June/July England’s “national anthem” Three Lions and aquatic-themed hits such as Adele’s Water Under the Bridge

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